Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, the world’s biggest beer maker, announced plans to get all of its electricity from renewable sources by 2025 and its strategy will begin in Mexico.

The initiative will imply shifting 6 terawatt-hours of electricity (almost enough to power all of Spain for a month) from fossil-fuel plants to wind, solar and other renewable sources, the Leuven, Belgium-based company said in a statement today.

AB InBev’s renewable electricity transformation will begin in the company’s largest Mexican brewery, located in Zacatecas. 

For that end, AB InBev has signed a Power Purchase Agreement with Iberdrola for 490 gigawatt-hours per year. With this new partnership, the company will be able to meet all of its purchased electricity needs for production sites in the country. The agreement with Iberdrola is also expected to increase Mexico’s wind and solar energy capacity by more than 5%.

Iberdrola will build and install 220 MW of wind energy capacity onshore in the state of Puebla, and energy generation is expected to begin in the first half of 2019.

AB InBev plans to enter into similar agreements in other markets in the near future. By launching this new partnership in Mexico, AB InBev hopes to demonstrate that by switching to renewable electricity, businesses across the world can contribute to a 100% renewable electricity future.

AB InBev plans to generate as much as 25 percent of its electricity itself, including by installing solar panels on its facilities. The company will buy the rest directly from wind and solar farms.

The company’s announcement comes the same day President Donald Trump signed an executive order to unravel rules to combat climate change, including cutting power-sector emissions.

MexicoNow

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