General Motors announced that all of its Ohio and Indiana manufacturing facilities – including those that build the Chevrolet Cruze and Silverado and GMC Sierra light-duty pickup trucks – will meet their electricity needs through 100% renewable energy next year. 

GM made its first wind purchase in 2014 for its operations in Mexico, followed by deals supporting Texas wind farms for 30 and 50 megawatts of energy.

Under its newest deal, GM is buying a total of 200 megawatts of wind energy from Ohio and Illinois wind farms. Once the turbines come online by the end of 2018, renewable energy will power 20% of GM’s global electricity use.

The new wind deals are enough to meet the electricity needs of Fort Wayne Assembly, Marion Metal Center and Bedford Casting plants in Indiana and Lordstown Assembly, Defiance Casting Operations, Parma Metal Center and Toledo Transmission plants in Ohio.

GM has used renewable energy for decades, saving about US$ 5 million annually as a result. Renewable energy use supports a resilient grid while offering more stable energy pricing. The company uses solar power at 26 facilities and generates electricity from landfill gas at two assembly plants.

MexicoNow

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