Jalisco’s avocado plantations have extended from 1,000 hectares in the year 2000 to 22,000 hectares in 2016. Now the state is Mexico's second biggest producer of this product, only after Michoacan, and plans to continue growing based on irrigation technology.

In an interview with El Economista, the director of the Association of Avocado Producing Exporters of Jalisco (Apeajal), Ignacio Gomez Arregui, said the cultivated area has had an average annual growth rate of 21.3% in the past 16 years.

"The sector has been growing strongly, particularly in Jalisco. There has been a strong investment in terms of irrigation technology and plant densities are higher," said Gomez Arregui.

"There have been investments, including foreign investment, made in very original packaging. This has helped to change the sector's face a little, especially to the south and southeast region of Jalisco, as it has generated a lot of well-paid jobs," said the director of Apeajal to El Economista.

According to data from Apeajal, in 2016 Jalisco produced 120,000 tons of avocado, 62,000 of which were exported. Of the total sales abroad, 30% was sent to Canada, 30% to Europe and a similar percentage was exported to Japan; While the remaining 10% was sold to Central and South America, Hong Kong, and the Middle East.

Currently, avocado production generates 9,000 direct jobs in Jalisco and 20,000 indirect ones.

Jalisco's avocado production is concentrated in 12 municipalities that have been certified as pest free, including Zapotlan el Grande, the Valley of Juarez, Tapalpa, Mazamitla, and La Manzanilla de la Paz.

El Economista

Related News

- Here’s the ad Avocados From Mexico will run during Super Bowl

- Mexican avocado producers resume strong shipments to U.S. market

- Fresh Del Monte to build Mexico’s largest avocado packing plant